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Iowa Democratic debate
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November Democratic debate
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CNN GLBT Democratic Town Hall
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September Democratic debate
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Climate Change Town Hall
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July Democratic debate
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2019 State of the State speeches
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2018 State of the State speeches
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2018 State of the Union speech
(Jan. 30, 2018)
2017 State of the Union speech
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Third Presidential debate
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Second Presidential debate
(Oct. 9, 2016)
Vice-presidential debate
(Oct. 4, 2016)
First Presidential debate
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Bernie Sanders vs. Hillary Clinton On the Issues
(paperback Feb. 2016)

Miami Democratic debate
(March 2016)
Miami Republican debate
(March 2016)
Republican primary debate in Detroit, Michigan
(March 2016)
CNN-Telemundo Republican debate on eve of Texas primary.
(Feb. 2016)
2016 CNN GOP Town Hall in South Carolina
(Feb. 2016)
2016 CBS News Republican Debate in S.C.
(Feb. 2016)
PBS Democratic Primary Debate in Wisconsin
(Feb. 2016)
2016 ABC News/IJReview Republican Debate in N.H.
(Feb. 2016)
MSNBC Democratic primary debate in New Hampshire
(Feb. 2016)
CNN Democratic Town Hall
(Jan. 2016)
Fox Iowa GOP debate
(Jan. 2016)
NBC/CBC Democratic debate
(Jan. 2016)
Fox Business GOP debate
(Jan. 2016)
State of the Union address
(Jan. 2016)
Hillary Clinton vs. Jeb Bush On the Issues
(paperback Feb. 2016)

CNN GOP Nevada debate
(Dec. 2015)
Syrian Refugee crisis
(Nov.-Dec. 2015)
CBS Democratic debate
(Nov. 2015)
Fox Business GOP debate
(Nov. 2015)
CNBC GOP debate
(Oct. 2015)

CNN Democrat debate
(Oct. 2015)

CNN GOP debate
(Sept. 2015)

Fox/Facebook GOP debate
(August 2015)

Marco Rubio vs. Jeb Bush On the Issues
(paperback June 2015)

Hillary Clinton vs. Rand Paul On the Issues
(paperback May 2015)

Rand Paul vs. Jeb Bush On the Issues
(paperback April 2015)

Jeb vs. Hillary On the Issues
(paperback Feb. 2015)

Rand vs. Ron Paul On the Issues
(Chart April 2015)

Hillary vs. Bill Clinton On the Issues
(Chart Feb. 2015)

Jeb vs. George Bush On the Issues
(Chart March 2015)

Excerpts from "Hard Choices"
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Excerpts from "Immigration Wars"
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Excerpts from "Government Bullies"
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Iowa pre-caucus Summits
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2015 presidential hopeful excerpts

Senate debates
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Recent books by...
Former Gov. Mitt Romney (R, MA)
No Apology
Rep. Paul Ryan (R, WI)
Young Guns
Pres. Barack Obama
The Audacity of Hope
V.P. Joe Biden
Promises to Keep
Former Rep. Ron Paul
End the Fed

Former Pres. George W. Bush
Decision Points
Former Gov. Sarah Palin (R, AK)
America By Heart
Secy. of State Hillary Clinton
Living History
Former Pres. Bill Clinton
My Life
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American Conspiracies

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2021-2022 Election Coverage:


2020 Senatorial debates:
- AL - AK - AZ - AR - CO - DE - GA-2 - GA-6 - ID - IL - IA - KS - KY - LA -
- ME - MA - MI - MN - MS - MT - NE - NH - NJ - NM - NC -
- OK - OR - RI - SC - SD - TN - TX - VA - WV - WY

2019-2021 Gubernatorial debates:
DE - IN - KY - LA - MO - MS - MT - NC - ND - NH - NJ - PR - UT - VA - VT - WA - WV

   
   

New member of the U.S. House of Representatives: Jan. 11-18, 2022

Plus hot races and House redistricting races


U.S. Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-FL-20) passed away in April 2021. A special election took place on Jan. 11, 2022 in which Sheila Cherfilus-McCormick won. In a sign of these challenging times for democracy, her opponent refused to concede despite the overwhelming landslide, and instead announced legal blocking actions. Those actions failed, and Rep. Cherfilus-McCormick was sworn in on Jan. 18, 2022.

    Other upcoming House events:
  • One more special election is scheduled for April 2022 to fill a vacancy in CA-22; if any more vacancies occur, the special election is likely to take place on November 8th, 2022, in conjunction with the general election.
  • Redistricting shuffles House seats around due to changes in population from the 2020 census. Five pairs of House incumbents got redistricted into opposing each other. Many more incumbents facing such opposition chose instead to retire.
  • Redistricting also goes the other way -- creating new seats in several states, and resulting in "hot races" from rematches or newly-eligible candidates.

Source: See full House of Representatives for other races and all incumbents.


January 6th Scorecard: Jan. 6, 2022

Scoring members of Congress on response to the Capitol Riot


We looked into three key votes to characterize each member of Congress' views on the events of January 6th. For each key vote, we scored the votes as follows on a scale from "-2" indicating support of the events of January 6th, to "+2" indicating opposition of the events of January 6th:

    Electoral Decertification: This vote took place on January 6th, after a long interruption by rioters entering the Capitol building. The vote was to block certification of the vote of the Electoral College:
  • YEA to block certification scores as -2 (support Jan. 6 events)
  • NAY to block certification scores as +2 (oppose Jan. 6 events)
    H.R. 24 Impeachment: President Trump was impeached for inciting insurrection. The impeachment vote, on bill #24, took place separately for the House and Senate:
  • NAY on impeachment in House vote scores as -2 (support Jan. 6 events)
  • NOT GUILTY on removal from office in Senate vote scores as -2 (support Jan. 6 events)
  • YEA on impeachment in House vote scores as +1 (oppose Jan. 6 events)
  • GUILTY on removal from office in Senate vote scores as +2 (strongly oppose Jan. 6 events)
  • SPONSOR on impeachment bill H.R. 24 scores as +2 (strongly oppose Jan. 6 events)
    H.R. 503 Commission: Congress created a Commission to investigate the events of Jan. 6th. The Senate rejected a bipartisan commission; that vote counts for Senators. Members of the House them created a separate commission without the Senate; that vote counts for House members:
  • NAY on creating a Jan. 6 Commission scores as -2 (support Jan. 6 events)
  • YEA on creating a Jan. 6 Commission scores as +2 (oppose Jan. 6 events)
Legislator categoryNumber of legislators
Hard-core J6 supporter (score -6)105
J6 supporter (score -3/-4/-5)27
Leaning toward J6 support (score -2)104
Mixed views on Jan. 6 (score -1/0/+1/+2/+3)26
Opposes Jan. 6 events (score +4/5)17
Hard-core against Jan. 6th (score +6)261
Grand Total540

The grid above totals the scores for each legislator, and then counts the number of legislators in each score category. These votes were spread over a few months, so some members didn't have the opportunity to cast all three votes -- those are reflected by omissions which count as zero in the score.

A score of "-6" indicates that the legislator voted three times to support the Capitol riots -- 105 legislators did so, all Republicans. A score of "+6" indicates that the legislator three times opposed the Capitol riots -- 261 legislators did so, 257 Democrats and 4 Republicans. The mixed votes are the most interesting cases-- the 174 legislators who indicated some support and some opposition to the events of Jan. 6.

The lowest-scoring Democrats all scored "+4" -- Sen. Patty Murray, Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, and Rep. Rashida Tlaib. In all three cases, the legislator abstained or was absent from one of the key votes. There were 10 additional Democrats scoring below "+5", but those were all legislators who left office, or who were sworn in after the earliest vote. There were 6 additional Democrats who voted YEA on impeachment but chose not to co-sponsor the House Bill; they scored "+5". In other words, there were zero Democrats who actively voted against the consensus Democratic view of opposing the Capitol riots of January 6th.

That was not the case among Republican legislators. There were five Republican Senators who scored "+6": Cassidy; Collins; Murkowski; Romney; and Sasse. In addition, two Republican House members scored "+5": Liz Cheney and Adam Kinzinger, both of whom voted to impeach but didn't co-sponsor H.R. 24. Those seven Republicans have become the political targets of former President Trump and his ardent supporters. Over 120 Republican legislators scored in the range of "-2' to "+3" -- some of that group will draw Republican primary opponents because of these votes.

Source: See Jan. 6th Scorecard data or click to download Jan. 6th Excel spreadsheet.


Investigation of Capitol Riots, Dec. 13, 2021

Opinions on the events of January 6th, 2021

As the Congressional investigation into the events of January 6th begins, we survey the opinions of elected officials and candidates, and group them into four partisan categories:

Republicans who support the events of January 6th:
Republicans who oppose the events of January 6th:
Democrats who oppose the events of January 6th:
Democrats who support the events of January 6th:
  • OnTheIssues could not find any elected officials or candidates who identify as Democrats who supported the January 6 insurrection. We will continue to look.

Source: See full excerpts on January 6th events.


Attorneys-General running for Governor: Dec. 5, 2021

Statewide elected officials running for higher office


Each state has an Attorney-General and other statewide elected offices -- the officeholders often run for Governor or Senate (or vice-versa).
    The statewide offices are:
  • Attorney General: Chief law enforcement officer
  • Treasurer: Chief financial officer and chief banker
  • Auditor: Chief fiscal officer (sometimes called "Controller" or "Comptroller")
  • Lieutenant Governor: Backup chief executive officer
  • Secretary of State: Chief election official and chief records clerk
This year's candidates from statewide offices are....
State Candidate Statewide elected position Current candidacy
AR Leslie Rutledge Attorney General since 2015 Candidate for Lt. Gov. 2022
AZ Mark Brnovich Attorney General since 2015 Candidate for Senate 2022
CA Alex Padilla Secretary of State 2015-2021 U.S.Senator 2022
FL Nikki Fried Commissioner of Agriculture since 2019 Candidate for Governor 2022
GA Jody Hice Candidate for Secretary of State 2022 U.S.Rep.2015-2021
ID Janice McGeachin Lt. Gov. since 2019 Candidate for Governor 2022
ID Raul Labrador Candidate for Attorney General 2022 U.S.Rep.2011-2018
KS Derek Schmidt Attorney General since 2011 Candidate for Governor 2022
MO Eric Schmitt Treasurer 2017-2018; A.G. since 2019 Candidate for U.S. Senator 2022.
MD Peter Franchot State Comptroller since 2007 Candidate for Governor 2022
MD Anthony G. Brown Candidate for A.G. 2022 U.S.Rep.2017-2021
NY Letitia James Attorney General since 2019 Candidate for Governor 2022
OH Josh Mandel Treasurer 2011-2018 Candidate for U.S. Senator 2022.
PA John Fetterman Lt. Gov. since 2019 Candidate for U.S.Senate 2022
RI Seth Magaziner General Treasurer since 2015 Candidate for Governor 2022.
VA Mark Herring Attorney General 2014-2022 Candidate for Governor 2021
WI Sarah Godlewski Treasurer since 2019 Candidate for U.S. Senator 2022.
WI Mandela Barnes Lt. Gov. since 2019 Candidate for U.S.Senate 2022
Source: See additional Attorneys-General andother statewide elected officials (new page!).


Election results, Nov. 2, 2021

Republicans gain ground in VA and NJ

  • The Republican nominee won in the Virginia gubernatorial race, against a strong Democrat who was expected to win.
  • The Democratic nominee won in the New Jersey gubernatorial race, but the Rpublican performed much stronger than expected.
  • Both outcomes suggest that the Republicans will regain control of both houses of Congress in 2022.
  • But look at the previous six elections for which party won these two off-year governorships -- not much of a pattern!

Virginia gubernatorial races New Jersey gubernatorial races

Source: See VA debate and NJ debate.


Late 2021 Political Books: Oct. 9, 2021

More political biographies for 2021 and 2022 races


Our crop of political biographies for 2022 Gubernatorial and Seantorial races

Fear: Trump in the White House, by Bob Woodward
, September 10, 2019

Our Time Is Now, by Stacey Abrams
, Jun. 9, 2020

Speaking for Myself, by Sarah Huckabee Sanders
, September 1, 2020

Persist, by Elizabeth Warren
, May 4, 2021

The Democrats

Education and Equality, by Danielle Allen, Feb. 9, 2018

Madam Speaker, by Susan Page
, Apr. 20, 2021

Kamala's Way, by Dan Morain
, Jan. 12, 2021

This Is What America Looks Like, by Ilhan Omar
, May 26, 2020
Source: See additional political biographies from the 2020 camapaigns.


Hot Mayoral races: Oct. 2, 2021

Mayoral contests on Nov. 2, 2021 (and more in 2022-23)


Some mayors are elected in odd years and some in even years. OnTheIssues covers some of the largest cities' mayors, including the races below.

Mayoral raceCandidates
Los Angeles, California Incumbent Eric Garcetti resigning to become Ambassador to India
U.S. Rep. Karen Bass, Democrat for L.A. Mayor
State Senate President Kevin de Leon, Democrat for L.A. Mayor
Chicago, Illinois
Election Feb. 2023
Former mayor Rahm Emanuel, resigning to become Ambassador to Japan
Lori Lightfoot, mayor since 2019
New York City, New York
Election Nov. 2, 2021
Incumbent Bill de Blasio, term-limited in 2021
Borough President Eric Adams, Democratic nominee
Jersey City, New Jersey
Election Nov. 2, 2021
Incumbent Steven Fulop, first elected 2013
Lewis Spears, non-partisan opponent
Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Election Nov. 2024 Incumbent Tom Barrett, resigning to become Ambassador to Luxembourg
Special election to be called after Ambassadorial process is completed.
Cleveland, Ohio
Election Nov. 2, 2021
Former Mayor Dennis Kucinich; served as mayor 1977 to 1979; ran in primary 2021
Cincinatti Mayor John Cranley; served as mayor since 2013
Justin Bibb (progressive Democrat) vs. Kevin Kelley (centrist Democrat)
Atlanta, Georgia
Election Nov. 2, 2021
Incumbent Keisha Bottoms; served as mayor since 2018; retiring 2021
City Councilor Antonio Brown vs. City Councilor Andre Dickens vs. former Mayor Kasim Reed, and several others running
Aurora, Colorado; Election Nov. 2022 Former U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman, incumbent Republican

Source: See additional 2021-2022 Mayoral coverage.


Hot Governor races: Sept. 15, 2021

California results: "No" on recall


There are three gubernatorial races in 2021: CA, NJ, and VA. The other races listed below are early reporting for the November 2022 races.

The California recall results are listed below -- all of the candidates listed are expected to run again in 2022. The percentage for Gov. Newsom indicates the result of "Question 1: Shall Gavin Newsom be recalled from the office of governor?" The other percentages are from "Question 2", who shoudl replace the Governor, if Question 1 passed (which it did not, so Newsom remains governor).

Gubernatorial raceDemocrat(s)Republican(s)
California (Sept. 2021 results) Gov. Gavin Newsom (66%)
CEO Kevin Paffrath (10%, top-placing Democrat)
Talk-show host Larry Elder (45%, top-placing Republican)
Mayor Kevin Faulconer (9%)
Talk-show host John Cox (5%)
Olympian Caitlyn Jenner (1%)
New Jersey (Nov. 2021) Gov. Phil Murphy (incumbent) State Rep. Jack Ciattarelli
Virginia (Nov. 2021) Former Gov. Terry McAuliffe CEO Glenn Youngkin
Florida (Nov. 2022) Former Gov. Charlie Crist Gov. Ron DeSantis (incumbent)
Georgia (Nov. 2022) State Rep. Stacey Abrams Gov. Brian Kemp (incumbent)
State Rep. Vernon Jones
Massachusetts (Nov. 2022) State Sen. Ben Downing
State Sen. Sonia Chang-Diaz
Gov. Charlie Baker (incumbent)
State Rep. Geoff Diehl
Maryland (Nov. 2022) MD Comptroller Peter Franchot
Education Secretary John B. King
Labor Secretary Tom Perez
State Del. Robin Ficker
MD Commerce Secretary Kelly Schulz
Ohio (Nov. 2022) Mayor Nan Whaley Gov. Mike DeWine (incumbent)
Rep. Jim Renacci
Texas (Nov. 2022) Rep. Beto O`Rourke Gov. Greg Abbott (incumbent)
State Sen. Don Huffines
Talk-show host Chad Prather
Rep. Allen West

Source: See additional 2022 Governor race coverage.


Hot Senate races: Sept. 3, 2021

Early 2022 Senate race coverage


It's early in the Senate election cycle (the election that will be held in November 2022) but plenty of states have hot races already. Our early coverage:

Senate raceDemocrat(s)Republican(s)
Alabama Rep. Terri Sewell Ambassador Lynda Blanchard
Rep. Mo Brooks
Alaska (No Democrat declared yet) Sen. Lisa Murkowski (incumbent)
Commissioner Kelly Tshibaka
Florida Rep. Val Demings Sen. Marco Rubio (incumbent)
Iowa Rep. Abby Finkenauer Sen. Chuck Grassley (incumbent)
State Sen. Jim Carlin
Kentucky State Rep. Charles Booker Sen. Rand Paul (incumbent)
Missouri State Sen. Scott Sifton
Marine Officer Lucas Kunce
Gov. Eric Greitens
Rep. Vicky Hartzler
North Carolina Justice Cheri Beasley
State Sen. Erica Smith
Gov. Pat McCrory
Rep. Ted Budd
Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan Treasurer Josh Mandel
Author JD Vance
Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden (incumbent) QAnon supporter Jo Rae Perkins
Pennsylvania Lt. Gov. John Fetterman
Commissioner Val Arkoosh
CEO Everett Stern
CEO Jeff Bartos
Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes
Treasurer Sarah Godlewski
Sen. Ron Johnson (incumbent)

Source: See additional 2022 Senate race coverage.


Ambassadorial Appointments: Aug. 25, 2021

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett nominated as ambassador to Luxembourg


President Biden has nominated numerous politicians as foreign ambassadors -- the full list so far appears below.

We wondered if Biden's number of political appointments was higher than usual -- so we made a list of Trump's political ambassadorships too.

The answer is: Both Biden and Trump made numerous political appointments, and that's fairly normal for ambassdorships.

We define "political appointment" as "a person who was covered by OnTheIssues for their elected role or campaign role, prior to their nomination as Ambassador."

Biden Ambassadorial AppointmentsTrump Ambassadorial Appointments

Source: See 2021 Biden Ambassadors' Confirmation Hearings for full issue coverage.


New York Gubernatorial Impeachment: Aug. 3, 2021

Governor Andrew Cuomo may resign


Update: Gov. Cuomo announced his regination on Aug. 10; Lt. Gov. Hochul will be sworn in on Aug. 24.
New York Attorney General Letitia James investigated allegations of sexual harassment against Governor Andrew Cuomo, and released a public report of their findings. Status of resignation and impeachment:
New York or related CandidateUpdate
Gov. Andrew CuomoGovernor would be up for re-election in November 2022; he says he will not resign, and will run for re-election
Lt. Gov. Kathy_HochulLieutenant Governor would step in if Cuomo resigns or is impeached
NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio"Severe misconduct" is "disqualifying"
President Joe Biden"I think he should resign"
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi"I call upon the Governor to resign"
Governors Ned Lamont (D-CT), Dan McKee (D-RI), Phil Murphy (D-NJ), and Tom Wolf (D-PA)Joint statement from four governors that "Governor Cuomo should resign from office."

Source: See 2022 New York Gubernatorial race for full issue coverage.


CPAC Conference, July 9-11, 2021

Straw Poll results from Conservative Political Action Conferences

  • The American Conservative Union holds the "CPAC Conference" annually, with a wide range of conservative speakers and candidates.
  • The ACU conducts a "straw poll" at each CPAC conference, indicating preferences for the next Republican presidential primary. While indicative mostly of conservative sentiment, this poll is widely reported in the media.
  • In 2021, for the first time, the ACU held two CPAC conferences: one in February and one in July, due to COVID restrictions.
  • We report on the poll results from both 2021 conferences below, with links to CPAC excerpts or additional excerpts.
  • Figures are from the "without Trump" poll for all candidates other than Donald Trump.

July 2021 CPAC straw pollFeb. 2021 CPAC straw poll

Source: See 2020-2021 CPAC Conference recent coverage, or from 2016-2019, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, or 2009.


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