Mark Sanford in State of South Carolina Archives


On Budget & Economy: Tipping point as civilization if we don't get spending right

Sanford stressed his efforts to rein in spending as a 3-term member of Congress and 2-term governor, noting that he was the first governor to turn back economic stimulus funds. "It all goes back to Nancy Pelosi and others. They have not pushed for financial discipline in Washington, D.C.," he said.

"We're at an incredible tipping point as a civilization and I think if we don't get spending right in Washington, D.C., there will be real consequences," Sanford said. "I've gotten into this race with the hope of taking what I've learned in Congress, what I learned in the governorship and what I've learned on the way up and on the way down and applying it to what I believe is the great debate of our civilization, which is indeed, how do we get our financial house in order."

Colbert Busch portrayed things differently. "Here's the fundamental difference. This is not the end of our time as we know it," she said. "The sky is not falling Henny Penny. In fact our best days are ahead of us."

Source: News12 on 2013 S.C. House District 1 debate Apr 29, 2013

On Government Reform: I was against earmarks before being anti-earmark was cool

[Colbert-Busch] cited Sanford's vote against the dredging of the Charleston port while he was a member of Congress. Colbert Busch said she met with then-US Rep. Sanford when she was working as a government liaison for a maritime company to encourage him to support the dredging project. Sanford, she said, indicated he would do so. "And, in fact, you didn't tell the truth. In fact, you turned around and did the opposite," Colbert Busch said to Sanford.

Sanford fired back that Colbert Busch later wrote him a $500 campaign-contribution check. "I don't think it must have bothered her that much, given she wrote a $500 check in support of my candidacy," said Sanford, smiling. Sanford also denied Colbert Busch's statements that he did not support the dredging and other economic-development projects, saying he disagreed with the methods of paying for the projects, not the actual projects. "Because I was against (congressional) earmarks before being against earmarks was cool," he said.

Source: The State webzine on 2013 S.C. House District 1 debate Apr 29, 2013

On Principles & Values: Voted to impeach Clinton for affair, but should be forgiven

Colbert Busch reminded Sanford that he once used taxpayer funds to "leave the country for a personal purpose"--referring to the extramarital affair with an Argentine woman he had while governor.

Later, Sanford was reminded by a questioner that he voted to impeach President Bill Clinton because of his involvement with Monica Lewinsky and asked if he would vote that way again. "I would reverse the question," Sanford said. "Do you think President Clinton should be condemned for the rest of his life for a mistake he made in his life?"

Sanford is trying to rebound from a scandal that sidelined his political career. In 2009, Sanford, after telling his staff he was out hiking the Appalachian Trail, revealed that he was in Argentina with a woman he later became engaged to after divorcing his wife, Jenny. Before leaving office, Sanford avoided impeachment but was censured by the Legislature over state travel expenses he used for the affair. He also paid the largest ethics fine ever in S.C, $70,000.

Source: News12 on 2013 S.C. House District 1 debate Apr 29, 2013

On Principles & Values: Now engaged to woman from 2009 extramarital affair

Only one reference was made to Sanford's 2009 admission to an extramarital affair. Answering a question about spending, Colbert Busch referenced Sanford's surprise absence from the state in June 2009 during which he visited his Argentinian lover, now his fianc�e. "When we talk about fiscal spending and we talk about protecting the taxpayers, it doesn't mean you take that money we saved and leave the country for a personal purpose," Colbert Busch said.

"She went there, Gov. Sanford," said the debate's moderator.

"I couldn't hear what she said," Sanford responded. "Repeat it, I didn't hear it."

"Answer the question," Colbert Busch said.

"What was the question?" asked Sanford, who then answered the original question on spending.

Source: The State webzine on 2013 S.C. House District 1 debate Apr 29, 2013

On Civil Rights: No civil unions; define one-man-one-woman marriage

Q Should South Carolina recognize civil unions between same-sex couples?

A: No.

Q: Should South Carolina restrict marriage to a union only between a man and a woman?

A: Yes.

Source: 2002 S.C. Gubernatorial National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2002

On Civil Rights: Affirmative action in state contracts, but not colleges

Q: Affirmative Action: Should race, ethnicity, or gender be taken into account in state agencies� decisions on:

Q: College and university admissions

A: No.

Q: Public employment

A: Yes.

Q: State contracting

A: Yes.

Source: 2002 S.C. Gubernatorial National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2002

On Crime: End parole for repeat violent offenders

Source: 2002 S.C. Gubernatorial National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2002

On Education: Endorses teacher-led prayer & displaying Ten Commandments

Source: 2002 S.C. Gubernatorial National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2002

On Government Reform: Limit campaign contributions but not campaign spending

Q: Do you support limiting individual contributions to state candidates?

A: Yes

Q: For PAC contributions?

A: Yes.

Q: For Corporate contributions?

A: Yes.

Q: For Political Parties?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring full disclosure of campaign finance information?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support imposing spending limits on state level political campaigns?

A: No. I believe we need to bring sunshine to the political process in SC. Soft money donated to parties should be disclosed.

Source: 2002 S.C. Gubernatorial National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2002

On Health Care: Transfer more Medicaid recipients into managed care programs

Source: 2002 S.C. Gubernatorial National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2002

On Local Issues: Supports term limits for state legislators

Q: Do you support the current limit of two, four-year terms for South Carolina governors?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support limiting the number of terms for South Carolina state senators and representatives?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support shortening the legislative session in South Carolina?

A: Yes.

Source: 2002 S.C. Gubernatorial National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2002

On Welfare & Poverty: Redirect welfare funding to faith-based organizations

Source: 2002 S.C. Gubernatorial National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2002

The above quotations are from State of South Carolina Politicians: Archives.
Click here for other excerpts from State of South Carolina Politicians: Archives.
Click here for other excerpts by Mark Sanford.
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